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Work CulturesThe speed of change that occurs within organizations has increased almost universally due to a number of factors, including the rise of the Internet and new opportunities for companies to gain market advantage if they move quickly. But with this change in how companies do business comes new expectations of leaders and workers. The currency the organization values is a set of behaviors they reward. It’s your job to find out what kind of culture you’re working within so that you can adapt, shine and reap the rewards. The faster you learn about these kinds of cultures and make your own adjustments, the sooner they pay off.

That being said, here are some cultures to consider when trying to identify the one in which you’re working. I go much more in depth about each of these, as well as other cultures, in my book From Cornered To Corner Office.

1. The Grindstone Culture

This is often an ideal culture for high achievers, as the name of the game is hard work. This type of organization values people who don’t mind late hours to get the job done. This is a fast-paced environment where change occurs often.

What they reward: Taking initiative to get the job done, long hours, embracing challenges.

2. The “Aha” Culture

This culture is all about new ways of thinking. It thrives on innovation. Employees are free to speak their minds and share opinions. The company is more likely to embrace ideas that challenge the status quo. Individuals who thrive on being creative fit naturally in this kind of environment.

What they reward: Coming up with new ideas and approaches, proposing a different solution, doing something no one else thought about doing.

3. The Process Culture

This culture loves structure. Well-defined job duties and procedures for each role are mandatory. Those in a Process Culture are great at measuring systems, productivity and services. They don’t like coloring outside the lines, but know what they do well.

What they reward: Developing user-friendly systems, processes to manage new business opportunities, better ways of measuring outcomes.

If this topic interest you, learn more in my book RINGMASTER.